VIVA BRAZIL

 

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Attention

  • talents !

05.2014

Juliana Llussá
Sculptural aesthetics

Passionate about Brazil's forests, Llussá trained as a cabinetmaker in order to explore the riches of wood and learn the finesse of craftsmanship. She now has her own atelier and has been awarded FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) certification. The design of each piece focuses on comfort, ergonomics and functionality, expressed through architecturally-balanced sculptural straight lines; everything is hand-assembled the traditional way using neither screws nor nails. The Arbol bookcase is one of her best-known pieces.

 

 


Rodrigo Almeida

Multicultural hybridism

Almeida believes an object should communicate, be of its era, represent its culture. As well as the material and cultural aspects influencing its physical realisation, an intangible dimension has to be taken into account: the Brazilian way of life. This young culture may not have such a long tradition of designing and manufacturing as European countries, but it does have distinctive historical and aesthetic references deriving from the indigenous, Portuguese and African roots from which it grows. Aligning himself with the Campana brothers, Almeida puts hybridisation and recycling at the heart of the design process. His work is based on exploring this identity, not by reproducing or improving existing concepts but by drawing inspiration from them.

 

 


Zanini de Zanine Caldas

Artisanship with new technologies

Zanine was born in 1978 and grew up watching his father work: the famous architect José Zanine Caldas, known for his modernist designs and for defending the cause of artisans and local materials. His son took up that torch in 2003 with his Carpintaria Contemporânea furniture collection for which he used wood salvaged from demolished houses. As an interesting counterpoint, Zanine also likes to work with new technologies and to experiment with materials. A good example is his sculptural Trez chair in laser-cut aluminium, a rereading of the work of two great artists: sculptor Amilcar de Castro, famous for his cut and folded steel and the father of modern Brazilian design, and Joaquim Tenreiro of the iconic three-legged chair.

 


Brunno Jahara

Part design, part art

Although born in Rio de Janeiro, Jahara's aesthetic and technical apprenticeship was European. His work is often a mixture of tropical organic forms in a wide variety of materials, a combination that gives unique results and makes each piece a collectable item. His inspiration comes from what society throws out; he collects assorted plastic items, such as bottle tops, and gives them a new life. Since 2010 he has been designing Vialight's Batucada lamps that he describes as "classic 20th-century industrial forms but whose beaten surfaces and bold colours emphasise their imperfections and uniqueness, so turning them into new contemporary icons". Instinctively and limitlessly multi-talented, Jahara produces graphic design, installations, objects, lighting, jewellery, furniture.