Art autrement

Villa-Cameline_Facade-d'entree.jpg

Aujourd'hui, lieu d'exposition, la Villa Cameline, une superbe demeure bourgeoise de 300 m2,
a retrouvé sa prestance, avec sa façade Belle Époque, son perron à la française, sa terrasse à l'italienne et son portail en fer forgé.

Maison Abandonnée

  • « Dialogue de formes, formes de dialogue »

05.2018

Showcasing art of today in a context far removed from the "white box" of contemporary galleries, the Villa is presently hosting a fertile, intimate exhibition by Alex Amann and Ralf Marsault.

Villa Cameline in Nice dates from early last century. Abandoned, squatted and graffitied, in 2003 it was bought by François and Hélène Fincker. A convincing promoter of local emerging artists, she has turned the house into an exhibition space open from April to October, where the pace of life is slow. "I borrowed my idea from Berlin's Kreutzberg district, which I discovered when I was 18," she says. "So there was nothing in the least new about it, but at the time it didn't exist in Nice." To date, nigh-on 200 artists have already shown their work here, leaving traces of their passage on its walls surmounted by floral mouldings. Right now, under Hélène Bastais's curatorship, a fascinating dialogue is engaged in this unusual venue, between Austrian painter Alex Amann, who takes figurative portrayal towards a form of dream, and anthropologist photographer Ralf Marsault. An encounter that builds bridges between their respective creative fields, from portraits to landscapes via still-lifes; an exchange encompassing the living and the inanimate, echoing the dual state in which Villa Cameline itself now exists, present in the here and now but frozen in time and history. Despite the apparent differences between the painting and the photography, both these artists strive to portray the reach of things rather than their material truth, in extremely precise stagings. The exhibition bears witness as well to the two artists' personal friendship. As well as affording a venue for solo art exhibitions, the Villa hosts collective projects that bring together creators of all types. As Hélène Fincker poetically expresses it: "From erotic, neurotic and democratic we've moved on to utopic and this September it will be the turn of atomic." Or an opportunity for scientists to take over this singular venue, a motionless but animated witness to so many artistic approaches, explorations and practices.

« Dialogue de formes, formes de dialogue » : 
Du 8 juin au 6 juillet

www.villacameline.com

Villa Henry comes alive
Trained museologist Isabelle Pellegrini has turned her Nice home into a venue for off-beat exhibitions and events focused on contemporary creation. This passionate art lover is also involved with the La Rosée retirement home in Nice, whose occupants and visitors now live among some 50 artworks by Jérôme Robbe, Thierry Lagalla, Sandra D. Lecoq and other artists. And through the Matériaux Mixtes association that she started with Elsa Guigo, she organises regular VisiteSlow events to make art accessible to everyone in unusual settings. Then there's 100TITRES* at Bel Œil: 100 artworks for sale, selected indiscriminately so as to ques­tion how we really relate to artistic crea­tion. Villa Henry will be showing artist Benoit Grimalt.